Fiberglass 3d printed parts


3D printing with fiberglass - 3D Printers - Talk Manufacturing

rbsonic1

#1

I’m looking for a way to build a 3D printer with fiberglass printing capability such as Markforged Mark One. I haven’t seen any alternatives to that one, so I was wondering if there are any extruders out there that support fiberglass printing at all? Ideally I would order a kit and then modify it in a way to add additional extruder for fiberglass, but I’m not sure what option would be the most viable. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

1 Like

ItsJustMidnight

#2

Hey,

just like you I’ve only heard of the Mark One being able to embed continuous fibre into printed parts. If you’re really looking to mod an existing design to do this, brace yourself for some experimenting. The Mark One uses essentially a dual extruder design, one for dispensing just nylon, the second one for nylon + fibre. Then there is the fibre feeding and cutting mechanism, accompanying firmware changes to control them, the custom slicer to embed the fibres… If this printer does what you need it do I’d advise against trying to put something like this together by yourself.

Sincerely,

Jonas

1 Like

StarkIndustries

#3

I own 3 Mark Forged prints, two mark 1 and a new Mark 2. I also own over 2 dozen FDM or SLA printers personally, so I feel I have a very firm grasp on various ranges of capabilities of 3D printers. The Mark Forged Mark 1 v2 (with the newer extruder ) are really in a class of their own. Looking at my Rostock v3 or makerbot z18 next to the Mark Forged printers, you could easily physically identify the quality difference in build and construction. I’ve built many 3D printers and those I didn’t build, I modified heavily, from code to hardware. The Mark 1 and 2 have an extremely intricate dual extruder as well as fiberglass auto cutting system. I literally mean that every component within the extruder AND every single surrounding component is machined and precise. It’s like comparing a Porsche to a Mustang…one is quality German engineering, the other is redneck tooled, mostly plastic, garbage. The fiberglass, Kevlar, or carbon fiber filament, is exclusive to mark forged as well…and no, proto pasta CFs not even close to the same concept. I’ve raved about how consistently reliable and precise the Mark 1 and Mark 2 can print. I’ve prototyped and printed parts that are currently in space, under the sea and used in combat, and while I may have used the other 3D printers to print the drafts, the alpha stage prototype part is always printed on one of my Mark Forged printers. Sure I sound like a Mark Forged salesman, I’m not, I just wanted to chime in and say " if I believed that a comparable printer could be built for a relatively cheaper or even similar price, I’d have done it". However the Mark forged finds itself in the same place as a Glowforged, its vastly better in hardware and software than anything else in its price range.

2 Likes

cSimplexity

#4

Well stated.

edsongebo

#5

Just keep in mind, the Markforged printer does not melt the fiber…it softens the material as it passes thru the print head, adhering to the nylon and dragging it in the desired pattern until the fiber strand is out. Every piece of fiber is done this way.

Fiberglass Filaments & Materials for 3D Printers

Fiberglass Filaments & Materials for 3D Printers | 3DE-Shop

B2B e-shop | All prices are without VAT | FOR UE CUSTOMER CHECK YOUR VAT HERE

EN IT FR

3DE-SHOP.COM

  1. Home
  2. Shop
  3. Consumables
  4. Filaments
  5. FiberGlass

Material Type

Application

Fiberglass Filaments & Materials for 3D Printers

  • 30
  • 60
  • 90

Markforged

Markforged Fiberglass CFF Spool 50cm3 3D filament

Request quotation

The Markforged 50cm3 Fiberglass CFF Spool is a high quality specialist 3D printing material for use with the Markforged range of 3D printers, at an affordable cost. Fibreglass filament provides a strength similar to Carbon Fibre, but with a lower stiffness (approx. 40% as stiff) and is only 2x the weight, as well as being electrically insulating. However, when compared to other materials which are available to reinforce composite materials such as Onyx, the flexural strength of fiberglass shows it to be leagues above the alternatives. Whilst PLA and ABS have the flexural strength equivalent to 75 MPa, Fiberglass can bend under forces without breaking until 215 MPa. Fibreglass is used with the CFF (Composite Filament Fabrication) nozzle to add reinforcing fibres to the Nylon or Onyx printed part. The Fiberglass CFF Spool is the perfect solution when printing parts that are required to be stiff yet still affordable. Examples of use cases include: functional prototypes, jigs, fixtures and end use parts. The Markforged Fiberglass CFF Spool  is compatible with Mark One, Mark One Professional, Mark Two, Mark Two Professional, Mark Two Enterprise, Onyx Pro, Markforged X5 and Markforged X7 (formerly known as Mark X) models.

Markforged

Markforged High Temp Fiberglass CFF Spool 150cm3 3D filament

Request quotation

High Strength High-Temperature Fiberglass CFF™ (Continuous Filament Fabrication) Spools. High Strength, High Temperature (HSHT) Fiberglass is a material uniquely designed for users who need strong parts in higher temperature environments (over 105°C, with a heat deflection point of 140°C). This capability is critical for the automotive and aerospace industries where load-bearing parts are continually expected to withstand higher temperatures. Possesses excellent durability Optimal for parts with repeated & sudden loading As stiff as fiberglass & more ductile HIgh impact resistance Bright yellow in color Compatible: Mark Two & X7

Markforged

Markforged Fiberglass CFF Spool 150cm3 3D filament

Request quotation

Fiberglass gives you 5 times the strength of Onyx parts alone Strength like Carbon Fibre Use for a wide variety of strong, robust parts To print parts that are required to be stiff yet still affordable For Use on Onyx Pro, Mark Two, X5 and X7 Systems only. Not compatible with Onyx One or X3. 150cm3 Continuous Fiberglass Filament

Markforged

Markforged High Temp Fiberglass CFF Spool 50cm3 3D filament

Request quotation

The 50cm3 Markforged High Temp Fiberglass CFF spool provides material with the highest impact resistance and highest heat deflection temperature of all of Markforged continuous fibres. Compared to alternative materials, the High Temp Fiberglass CFF spool shows a heat deflection temperature of 150° C, compared to 97° C in parts printed from ABS and 52° C in parts printed from PLA. For Use on Markforged Mark Two and X7 Systems Only. Not compatible with Onyx One, Onyx Pro, X3 or X5 Systems 50cm3 Continuous High Temperature Fiberglass Filament

3D-printed hydraulics and robot, printing fiberglass

News

Subscribe to

Subscribe

I do not want

1.

Researchers from the Laboratory of Information Technologies and Artificial Intelligence of the Massachusetts Technology Institute, the video published by the video, the video was published which demonstrates the work of ready-made hydraulic units created by simultaneously printing several materials on a 3D printer. The report will be presented at the ICRA 2016 conference. The authors of the work used a Stratasys Objet260 for printing with several nozzles through which materials with different characteristics are fed. With multiple nozzles, the printer can simultaneously print the rigid and elastic body parts of the hydraulic assembly and immediately fill the fluid, eliminating the need for subsequent refilling and pumping. So you can print pumps and pumps immediately assembled.

Scheme

In particular, the researchers managed to print a gear hydraulic machine. Also, using the printing of finished hydraulics, the authors printed a working six-legged walking robot, which is driven by a single electric motor.

The authors note that their method allows the creation of hydraulic systems that would be impossible to obtain by traditional installation of a separate system. In addition, this production method does not require any additional filling manipulations, since the liquid is placed inside already during the printing process.

In the published video, the authors demonstrate the performance of previously printed devices. Examples include a hydraulic gear machine, a hexapod driven by a single electric motor, and individual hydraulic actuators:

. You can read about the device on the company's website.

The 3D Cocooner is an EXPT-45 series dynamic robotic mount with an extruder mounted on it, through which fiberglass and photocurable adhesive are fed. Also, a circular saw is mounted on the manipulator, which cuts off parts of the structure from the extruder, because. fiberglass - continuously (somewhat reminiscent of 'Anizoprint').

The design system software has a built-in simulator that allows you to evaluate the reliability and rigidity of the final design even before production begins. According to the developers, this approach makes it possible to design and manufacture three-dimensional structures without additional supporting elements.

Based on materials from nplus1.ru and youtube.com.

Follow author

Follow

Don't want

9

More interesting articles

ten

Subscribe author

Subscribe

Don't want

IZH H600 Hybrid Machining Center combines Direct Power 3D Printing. ..

Read more

ten

Subscribe to the author

Subscribe

Don't want

The results of the first experiments on 3D printing with polymer materials in microgravity, pro...

Read more

53

Subscribe author

Subscribe

Don't want

As we all know, a true 3D printer must have a solid acrylic body, high quality...

Read more

Thermwood Corporation is ready to use large-format 3D printers in the production of fiberglass boats

News

Thermwood Corporation demonstrated the capabilities of its proprietary large-format LSAM hybrid 3D printer by producing a 3D printed model and a fiberglass mold for the production of boat hulls. Although the plant allows the production of finished polymer products, the company focuses on the production of tooling for casting and vacuum forming.

Let's tell you how it works.

Thermwood Corporation was originally engaged in the production of furniture, or rather plastic parts "under the tree." The company created and continues to create the necessary equipment on its own, eventually becoming one of the first and most famous manufacturers of industrial machine tools with numerical control. The company has shown interest in additive technologies relatively recently, and the impetus was cooperation with the notorious Local Motors company, the world's first manufacturer of cars with 3D printed bodies.

The bodies are printed on Cincinnati Incorporated's large-format BAAM FDM 3D printer, but then require extensive post-processing, including milling and sanding. For machining, the equipment from Thermwood Corporation is just used. Surprised by the results, Thermwood management decided to create their own analogue of a huge 3D printer, since portal CNC milling machines were already in stock. It remains only to scale the design and hang the extruder. The technology is called LSAM (“Large-Scale Additive Manufacturing” or “Large-Scale Additive Manufacturing”), and proprietary installations retain the possibility of mechanical post-processing of printed products.

In principle, the company could have followed the same path as Local Motors, but since the company has long established casting and vacuum forming processes, Thermwood decided to complicate the process a bit in order to improve the quality of finished products. In other words, they decided to use the installation not for printing bodies, but for printing master models of bodies - templates for the manufacture of molding equipment. Still hulls, not bodies, because Thermwood paid attention to water, not road transport.

Boats and yachts with fiberglass hulls appeared in the 60s, quickly gaining popularity. One of the main factors that increase the cost of production is the manufacture of molding equipment. The equipment itself is made either from wood and plywood, and then assembled for a long time and painstakingly, or from the same fiberglass according to wooden templates. It is possible to simply print the hull, even using carbon fiber composites, as Local Motors does, but the relatively high porosity and delamination potential do not lend themselves well to water use. On the other hand, it is possible to quickly and cheaply print a template, and make molds and bodies in the traditional way, from fiberglass. That's where they stopped.

The yacht builder Marine Concepts took part in the project, providing the original design of the boat, and the materials science company Techmer PM, which supplied the engineers with Electrafil ABS LT1 proprietary ABS plastic. The finished master model weighs about 700 kg, it took about thirty hours to 3D print it, and post-processing took another 50 hours.

In principle, the extruder of the pilot plant is capable of extruding almost a hundred kilograms of ABS plastic per hour, and the size of the working area reaches 3x6 meters, but they decided to print the model in parts, apparently due to heat shrinkage. The printed components were glued together with urethane resin, and then machined - on the same machine, but now completely. After that, it remains only to cover the master model with fiberglass resin, wait for it to dry and remove the mold from the template.

Although in this case the master model was printed for the manufacture of only the lower mold, there is nothing to prevent the printing of double-sided templates from which you can remove the upper and lower parts of the tooling at once. At a minimum, this will lead to significant savings in plastic. Based on the results of the first experiments, the company's specialists are confident that the process can be greatly simplified by printing plastic forms immediately instead of templates.

Do you have interesting news? Share your developments with us, and we will tell the whole world about them! We are waiting for your ideas at [email protected]

Follow author

Follow

Don't want

12

More interesting articles

5

Subscribe to the author

Subscribe

Don't want

Researchers from Peter the Great St.


Learn more